Jump to content


Photo

Politics Free Weak End


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
405 replies to this topic

#61 Dharmaeye

Dharmaeye

    Doctor of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,943 posts

Posted 29 August 2008 - 11:51 PM

If that's the latest, he's repeating himself. I remember reading something very similar to that from him at least a year ago.

Maybe today is Groundhog Day. :huh:

View Post


PetroCanada service stations out of gasoline in Alberta................ refinery in Edmonton.
This goes back to nationalization of resources by the Liberal party in the early eighties and the National Energy Policy. Continued incompetence.
Expect the Eastern controlled Government to do it again- kill the goose that laid the golden egg. Just a matter of when.

#62 roxy

roxy

    Master of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,978 posts

Posted 29 August 2008 - 11:56 PM

What would you say if he picked an ugly one? :lol:

View Post

Attached Images

  • Sarah_Palin_Vogue_1_.jpg


#63 Bob_Boberson

Bob_Boberson

    Stock Proctology Intern

  • Banned
  • Pip
  • 212 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 12:00 AM

Walmart has raised the standard of living of Americans - I would guess substantially. It did at least three things that benefit the vast majority of Americans:

1. It took billions of dollars from hundreds of thousands of parasites (you call them mom and pop retailers but it's difficult for me to see where they added value along the supply chain) and put that money in the pockets of people who produced goods and services that did add value to the commonweal.

2. If forced those hundreds of thousands of mom and pop retailers into more productive lines of work.

3. It used economies of scale to bring cheap consumer goods to vast swathes of the population that had never had the opportunity to afford to buy new things.

I understand that people have this nostalgia for Mr. Cratchet who ran the haberdashery in the middle of town and always patted them on the head when their moms brought them in to buy their new school clothes. But the people who shop at Walmart couldn't afford Mr. Cratchet (and his 100% markups) so screw him.
It was either that or a Russian bathing beauty

#64 Charmin

Charmin

    Dean of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 34,177 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 12:03 AM

Sure! Is that this one?

View Post


Yup, thanks
Cycles + Wyckoff + NTM = TechnoPile
A true Master averts disaster

#65 roxy

roxy

    Master of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,978 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 12:07 AM

Walmart has raised the standard of living of Americans - I would guess substantially. It did at least three things that benefit the vast majority of Americans:

1. It took billions of dollars from hundreds of thousands of parasites (you call them mom and pop retailers but it's difficult for me to see where they added value along the supply chain) and put that money in the pockets of people who produced goods and services that did add value to the commonweal.

2. If forced those hundreds of thousands of mom and pop retailers into more productive lines of work.

3. It used economies of scale to bring cheap consumer goods to vast swathes of the population that had never had the opportunity to afford to buy new things.

I understand that people have this nostalgia for Mr. Cratchet who ran the haberdashery in the middle of town and always patted them on the head when their moms brought them in to buy their new school clothes. But the people who shop at Walmart couldn't afford Mr. Cratchet (and his 100% markups) so screw him.

View Post


In small rich towns all around the country there is a plenty of small boutique shops, selling merchandise more or less in line with a good mall but at absurdly high prices. Spoiled merchants and spoiled customers. Yes, my wife never buy me anything worse than banana republic or ll bean, but it's still much cheaper than those strange shops with $400+ shoes.

#66 roxy

roxy

    Master of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,978 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 12:09 AM

Yup, thanks

View Post


I stole that chart from this guy:

http://stockcharts.c...t?obj=ID2393449

#67 Charmin

Charmin

    Dean of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 34,177 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 12:26 AM

I stole that chart from this guy:

http://stockcharts.c...t?obj=ID2393449

View Post


He says he spends "3 to 4 hours of homework everyday" on charts. I'm worn out looking.
Cycles + Wyckoff + NTM = TechnoPile
A true Master averts disaster

#68 nymphcaster

nymphcaster

    Stock Proctology Intern

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 196 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 12:30 AM

Wal-Mart has singlehandedly destroyed many of the U.S. manufacturers and thousands upon thousands of small retailers. It's just Gresham's Law in action -- the bad drives out the good. People buy stuff of poor quality that is cheaply made by slave labor in China, and manufacturers in other countries, especially the U.S., just can't compete. So, to survive, the U.S. companies started doing their manufacturing in China. Then, people lose their jobs or have to take lower-paying jobs to survive, so they have no choice but to buy cheap crap at Wal-Mart.

Sam Walton was a great patriot, wasn't he?

As far as trying to deal with WMT if you have a product to sell -- they will find a way to rape you. I know people who have had horrible, company-destroying experiences with those scumballs. I won't say that I won't buy anything from WMT -- if I were stranded in a snowstorm, and the only warm place around was WMT, I would go in and buy a Coke or a bottle of water so I could come in out of the cold.

By the way, CostCo is a whole different ball game. I have nothing but respect for the ethical way they have run their company.

View Post


What I heard from two different sources was that regarding WMT (via a seminar), suppliers are brought in to bid against one another in a way which gets to the bottom dollar in a way that almost sounds like the Spanish Inquisition. (If you like WMT as a SH or user that's a good thing in the sort term but hard on their suppliers.)
For Costco, the membership price is the thing, I heard. That's where costco is making its money. On memberships. (I haven't read to see if that's true, but what one person said.)

Is it true? I don't know. Frankly, why would Costco, with tiny margins, avoid the WMT programme? Presumably they will get to the WMT programme on pricing, if they haven't already. I think where Costco does better is with regard to employees and benefits. Costco employees are friendly. But its all a small percentage biz, which I see as the big problem with commodity issues.

#69 Goldmember

Goldmember

    Professor of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,042 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 12:51 AM

Walmart has raised the standard of living of Americans - I would guess substantially. It did at least three things that benefit the vast majority of Americans:

1. It took billions of dollars from hundreds of thousands of parasites (you call them mom and pop retailers but it's difficult for me to see where they added value along the supply chain) and put that money in the pockets of people who produced goods and services that did add value to the commonweal.

2. If forced those hundreds of thousands of mom and pop retailers into more productive lines of work.

3. It used economies of scale to bring cheap consumer goods to vast swathes of the population that had never had the opportunity to afford to buy new things.

I understand that people have this nostalgia for Mr. Cratchet who ran the haberdashery in the middle of town and always patted them on the head when their moms brought them in to buy their new school clothes. But the people who shop at Walmart couldn't afford Mr. Cratchet (and his 100% markups) so screw him.

View Post



Tell us how you really feel... :lol:

Gawdamn right!

We've been getting ripped off for too many years by the local businesses in my town. What a greedy bunch of assholes! Spend the week sucking as many dollahs out of the hardworking masses as they could get away with, and then some, and strut to their Chamber of Commerce meetings and then play their Pillar Of the Community bullshit amongst their robber baron bretheren. Eff 'em all!

Generally anyone who respected their money and income had to shove the family in the wagon on Saturday and drive down the See to Die highway to Vangroovy for any major purchase or even groceries.

My how things have changed...A plethora of new businesses and stores and yes, even Walmart and Home Depot came here into an already established business park. Cut-throat competitive for my dollah.

On the other hand, my little berg is more and more becoming a suburb of the city...it will soon be time for me to find another locale.

For a self described Joe Six pack like me I find myself at the Walmart often because it's close and cheap...and I'm cheap.
Anthony caused pearls to be dissolved in wine to drink the health of Cleopatra; Sir Richard Whittington was as foolishly magnificent in an entertainment to King Henry V; and Sir Thomas Gresham drank a diamond, dissolved in wine, to the health of Queen Elizabeth, when she opened the Royal Exchange; but the breakfast of this roguish Dutchman was as splendid as either. He had an advantage, too, over his wasteful predecessors: their gems did not improve the taste or the wholesomeness of their wine, while his tulip was quite delicious with his red herring.here

#70 shorty

shorty

    Clinical Professor of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,938 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 01:52 AM

Walmart has raised the standard of living of Americans - I would guess substantially. It did at least three things that benefit the vast majority of Americans:

1. It took billions of dollars from hundreds of thousands of parasites (you call them mom and pop retailers but it's difficult for me to see where they added value along the supply chain) and put that money in the pockets of people who produced goods and services that did add value to the commonweal.

2. If forced those hundreds of thousands of mom and pop retailers into more productive lines of work.

3. It used economies of scale to bring cheap consumer goods to vast swathes of the population that had never had the opportunity to afford to buy new things.

I understand that people have this nostalgia for Mr. Cratchet who ran the haberdashery in the middle of town and always patted them on the head when their moms brought them in to buy their new school clothes. But the people who shop at Walmart couldn't afford Mr. Cratchet (and his 100% markups) so screw him.

View Post

I don't disagree with any of your three points, although regarding #2 the "more productive lines of work" many moms and pops were forced into were as Walmart greeters (but hey, screw 'em! :lol: :mellow: ). Also, the advantage of mass availability of cheaply-priced products is partially offset by the fact that in many cases those products are not what they appear to be, they are cheap quality and people are being duped into buying them because they only search for the lowest price, so sometimes they end up paying more in the long run. But hey, it's a free market, people can choose for themselves, and the majority have clearly chosen Walmart over Mr. Cratchet.

In the world of retail, Walmart punished the few for the good of the masses, using leveraged technology and distribution.

I think we could extend their model to other parts of the economy.

For example, California flushes $50,000,000,000.00 per year down the toilet on public education. We could shut down all the local neighborhood public schools in the United States, sell all the buildings and property, fire all the public teachers, and outsource our kids' education to worldwide experts recorded on the Internet. It would be much much cheaper, and kids could learn at their own pace from the best of the best, not just whoever in their town thinks they can be a teacher, but from the best, whether that's in India or China or Antarctica. Then all those fired public school teachers could find something more productive to do. Or, if they can't, then screw 'em! :lol:

We have 450,000 real estate agents in CA. We need zero. They should all be banned, all real estate transactions should be done on the internet free of commission.

All stockbrokers should be fired. We don't need them. People should be able to trade directly with each other on the internet commission-free.

All lawyers should be banned. Free online forms should be the only way to file any legal record.

Technology is changing everything. To hell with anyone who cannot keep pace. We don't need people as much as we used to, just products and services. People add little or no value.

I'm not being sarcastic. It's already happening. This is the wave of the future. LegalZoom.com, Zillow, etc. Remote learning at the post-graduate level, will eventually be extended to K-12 and there will be no need at all for local teachers, they will be a horrible hindrance and prevent kids from being educated at world-class levels.

Cynical Pontificator of Crock Stocktology

Tiger's Wood, Anthony's Weiner, Barney's Frank, Herman's Cain, Harry's Reid, Elliot's Spitzer
 


#71 Drano

Drano

    Dean of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23,315 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 06:23 AM

There were always discount retailers where people could buy new stuff for very little money. Wal-Mart took that to a whole different level by aggressively locating the cheapest of the cheap foreign manufacturers, and rapaciously squeezing independent suppliers so that they had no choice but to cheapen their quality and move all of their manufacturing to China. You can find many non-tin-foil-hat sources that discuss the contention that Wal-Mart was THE most important reason that American manufacturing has been destroyed.

No one ever called Henry Ford a "liberal." Yet, he paid his workers a good wage because he said he wanted his workers to be able to buy the product they were making. Eliminating jobs by outsourcing manufacturing is how the rape of the middle class was started. There is a domino effect when many jobs are lost, because then service jobs are lost because people can no longer afford them. For instance, this is part of why emergency rooms have increasing numbers of people coming in for basic health care services or emergency situations that would have never gotten to that stage if they had seen doctors when the problem started. In 50 years, Wal-Mart's actions in hollowing out American society so that there are only two classes will be viewed as the crucial action that destroyed the greatness of the American dream.

As far as mom and pop stores being overpriced, that is a ridiculous broad generality which is not true in all cases. Some of my family members have had retail stores in which quality merchandise was offered for a very fair price, and the service they provided by making sure things fit properly, and special-ordering things for people, etc. were well worth paying a dollar or two more than at a big-box store where you're on your own, trying to find cheap junk that would fit. There are still plenty of smaller stores that offer a good value. For instance, there is a locally-owned hardware store that I go to that is slightly more expensive than Home Depot, because they do not have the purchasing power that a giant chain can force upon its suppliers. But when I go to that store, if I have a question about how to do something or what product is best, there is always someone there who can help me.

And as far as CostCo goes: for years Wall Street hated them because they paid their employees too well and supposedly did not have a high enough profit margin (they guarantee that nothing in the store will be priced at more than 14% above what CostCo paid for it). The have capped their CEO's pay at a reasonable level, and they guarantee that their house brand will be as good or better as the national brands. I have often bought their Kirkland brand items and have found them to be of high quality. It's unfortunate that the Wal-Mart model of bullying and cutting corners has so infected our society, that people can't understand why a business wouldn't want to be like them. Part of CostCo's corporate mission is to treat their employees fairly. I know people who work there part-time because the health insurance they get as part-time employees is better than the insurance they get in their full-time jobs. (These are TEACHERS, by the way.) If more businesses were like CostCo, this would be a kinder, gentler country. I patronize them whenever I can. And when I get my rebate check from them every year, it is for far more than the cost of the membership. There is a reason why, when a new store opened here and the CEO came for the opening day, people were lining up to shake his hand and get autographs.
Of course I'm caustic!

#72 Mies van der Rump

Mies van der Rump

    Bachelor of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 622 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 07:43 AM

OK, last one...someone had to post it:

Posted Image

#73 fxfox

fxfox

    Dean of Stock Proctology

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,196 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 09:20 AM

EUR/USD weekly

the target is more than obvious, tons of support at higher 1.30s level, thats the target. First there should be a bounce a that minor uptrend (thin green line)

EURUSDweekly300808.png


zoom:

EURUSDweekly300808zoom.png
'patriot' is formed with 'patria' and 'idiot'

#74 DrStool

DrStool

    Chief of Stock Proctology

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 84,338 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 09:26 AM

Well, I shop at Wal Mart all the time. The quality of the stuff I buy is pretty much the same as at Bloomingdales and Macy's. Prices are a lot lower.

Most retailers treat their employees like crap. Costco is the exception.

My father and mother, my grandfather and grandmother were mom and pop retailers. My father was the most honest, hardworking person I ever knew. He never cheated anyone, and never overcharged anyone. He charged what he had to charge to survive, and even that was difficult. I know many others like him.

My grandfather was a very wealthy merchant and landlord until the depression. He lost everything except his grocery store and the building that housed it, which was the family home. During hard times, he kept dozens, if not hundreds of families alive by extending credit to them to buy groceries. My grandmother went around to see the people who owed them money, and when she heard their tales of woe, she gave them more credit. My grandfather died with limited means, as did my father.

I know many other small merchants or former small merchants just like them. They loved their their families and took good care of their customers. They did what they had to do. They did what they could.

If a person characterizes all mom and pop businesses with a broad brush that all were and are evil greedy bastards, I think reveals more about the thought processes of the person making the characterization, than it does about small merchants.

That being said, I do shop at Wal Mart. It saves me and my family a lot of money. The employees (in the US) don't look all that happy, but at least they have jobs, and when I look at many of them I can only wonder where they might work if not for Wal Mart, at any pay level. Here in our little town in Quebec, when Wal Mart opened up about 5 years ago, the people in town were thrilled, and those who got jobs there felt like they had won the lottery. They still feel that way. They love it there. It's a high paying, good job, for our locale.

Sure, WalMart is evil in a lot of ways, but this is not a pure black and white case. There are plusses and minuses. By making goods more affordable to millions who otherwise might not be able to afford them, and by opening stores in locations where other retailers wouldn't dare go, they have helped a lot of people. By cutting wages and benefits, and prices too, they have driven others out of business. But so have Home Depot, Lowes, Costco and other big box stores. At the same time, many small town downtowns are seeing revivals with specialty retailers finding a new niche based on convenience, service, charm, and specialized products and services.

And even though the unions have failed to unionize the stores, their publicity campaigns and organizing efforts have actually succeeded to some degree. WalMart isn't the gentle giant, for sure, but these anti WalMart campaigns have succeed to a degree in making WalMart just a little kinder to its employees, and a little friendlier to their communities. Walmart didn't do it out of the goodness of its heart, but for good public relations. They are not as evil as they once were.

If your portfolio has you feeling irregular, for fast, long lasting relief, take a subscribatory. And support your local Stool!

#75 DrStool

DrStool

    Chief of Stock Proctology

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 84,338 posts

Posted 30 August 2008 - 09:32 AM

I have looked at Zillow, and we discussed it here a few weeks back, I think. The house is down about 35% from the price at which I sold it.

It's still a lot cheaper to rent in South Florida. Rents are dropping almost as fast as selling prices. Oversupply can only be absorbed when there are more final users, and that's not happening. All the speculative knife catching in the world won't change that. They have to get rid of inventory, or more people must come in to the market.

Inventory is being reduced as vacant housing falls into a dilapidated state. This is the process of blight that I predicted 4 years ago. As the blight progresses, more properties will come off the market. Supply will be reduced, and eventually equilibrium will be reached, but Florida will be a far different, more forlorn and dangerous place than it was in 2004.

If your portfolio has you feeling irregular, for fast, long lasting relief, take a subscribatory. And support your local Stool!





Stock market portfolio giving you the runs? See Dr. Stool.

Take a subscribatory!
Download 
The Anals of Stock Proctology now!



The Daily Stool - Stock Market Message Board
Stool's Gold- Gold and Precious Metals Forum
Look Out Below Message Board

Support your local Stool Board.


The Al E. Greenspeuman designer line at Stoolmart. Get yours today! Click here now!
Get Mugged!


Dr. Stool's
Book Search

Enter title, author, or keyword
Just books
All Products





Old Stool Depository

Live Steaming Pile Chart