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#61 Brisbane Bear

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 12:49 AM

I just accepted my invitation to the party....long the Ords,that should be the end of the run...lol

hope I am still laughing in the morning.. :blink:

#62 jickiss

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 12:51 AM

jickiss is back!

and


well, just got back from Rosemont, a lecture,
so have been away from the compuker since the afternoon,

but, it sure was spooky to have gotten the following chart in an e mail.

jickiss!

Attached Images

  • tre_cm_03_14_2006_from_ameritrade.JPG

"Every Bubble ends in fear and panic. This one will too." --Machinehead, March 29, 2005

On September 06, 2006, TRE closed at $6.50.
On September 19, 2006, CDE closed at $46.30 (adjusted for reverse split)
.


On Oct. 17, '06, Goldman (GS) closed at $183.07 (jickiss Sell) whilst Newmont (NEM) closed at $43.24 (jickiss Buy).

"Politics in America has become a playground of fictions. The politicians tell the public what the public wants to hear. Whether the question is social security, education, budget deficits or national security, the public wants to believe that things aren�t so bad." --Written by J.R. Nyquist, December 8, 2006.

"Private sector employees will never retire, they will work literally to death, dying sick broke and busted with absolutely no hope whatsoever." -- Shorty, on March 15, 2009.

"Luck is the most precious commodity in the world." Brisbane Bear, October 25, 2007.

"Luck favors the prepared mind." Mr. James Dines, back in the 80s, in "The Dines Letter."

"With Luck, anything is Possible, but without Luck, virtually nothing Good ever happens." --- The jickiss Mantra, sad but True.

#63 FreeFall

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 01:23 AM

What a joke... this move up with low volume ... :ph34r:

Interesting DJIA chart (Break out or Break down)
http://wallstreetbea...608&post=119175

SPX Chart (place your bets)
http://wallstreetbea...611&post=119179

good night and short em when they're high...

#64 beardrech

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 01:38 AM

Still Dryheaving.....

Posted Image

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

it's a race against time or they'll have to shut down and the common stock will go to zero

they gave away $200 Million to the hairball

now they gotta pump up advertising revenue to cover the operating expense

most of Howard's fans are stealing the show, not subscribing

karma

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Nathaniel West-Author of Day o the Locust-- Where are you now that we need you???

Equally Ironic--Don Imus,am radio host,loaded up the Ass with Siri Stock and a mortal enemy of H Stern is also going down in this whirlpool of ffinacial swill--

beardrech :ph34r: :ph34r: There are so many ironies here I just got to get my membership in the US Steelworkers Union

#65 beardrech

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 02:17 AM

H S Dent has an interesting article on todays Daily Reckoning...he reckons 2010 before the shite hits the fan.

4 more years of this will be enough to send me completely insane... :lol:  :huh:  :o

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Dent makes alot of observations based on an elitist mindset, a very common failing of the Daily Reckoning. The publisher, Bill Bonner, doesn't even live in America but that doesn't stop him from hurling rocks from his european abode.

Here is a quote from the Dent piece:

The single biggest expense to the average family is children, and the older they get the more expensive they become until they finally leave home. The U.S. Government estimates that the cost of raising a child born today from birth through high school to be $211,370. Raising the standard two children would set an American family back nearly half a million dollars, and these figures do not take university education costs into account. It is this highly predictable spending by families that drives our modern, mass-affluent economy. This spending continues even during very difficult times, as the first half of this decade has shown.


He completely fails to explain how this spending continues. It is simple. The housing ATM. I'd also like to examine how the government came to that 211,370 figure, 'cause that smells like BS too.

Since the year 2000, Americans have suffered through one of the worst bear markets in history, a disputed presidential election in 2000, and the worst terrorist attack in American history, two subsequent wars in Afghanistan in Iraq, and a massive oil bubble. Yet despite the chaos, consumer spending has actually risen every quarter though it all. It appears that even calamities of biblical proportions cannot stop the American consumer.


Helloooo... Americans are clearly in more debt than ever before! It's on practically every chart in the freakin' universe! Consumer debt, lack of savings, housing ATM. That is how the spending continues

Are Americans blind to the world around them? Of course not. At worst, they can be accused of being a little stubborn. Americans will do anything in their power to maintain their standard of living, even if it means taking on more debt than they should. The typical American dad doesn’t consider the trade deficit or the price/earnings ratio of the S&P 500 when Junior grows an inch and needs a new pair of jeans. Instead, Dad just buys the jeans and figures out how to pay for it later. As a general rule, people simply do not consider the macro economy when making household decisions. They may fret about it, but at the end of the day they still buy that big, gas-guzzling SUV when Junior and his friends start carpooling to soccer practice.


Please Harry, come out of your elitist house the hamptons. The man on the street does not know what the trade deficit even is, who their representatives in Congress are, how interest rates work, or even what a price/earnings ratio is.

The good news is that the largest section of the Baby Boomer generation is quickly approaching their peak spending years, which will shift our economy into another bubble boom. The bad news is that once this mass of Boomers passes that threshold, consumer spending will slow down progressively for over a decade. When it does, our economy and stock markets will suffer.


And that boom will be in what this time? Stocks? Housing is done, unless the boomers figure out how to trade amongst themselves. Everyone below them is locked out unless exotic loans can be used.

Our policymakers will follow the example of the Japanese, because it is the only model they can reasonably be expected to follow. And as in Japan, the policies used will ease the pain a little but will certainly not cure the disease. Americans, long scolded by the rest of the world as being spendthrifts, will suddenly start to resemble their Asian counterparts in their saving habits. Consumer spending will fall, and the economy will scratch and claw frantically just to avoid falling into the abyss of deflation, the likes of which haven’t been seen on American shores since the 1930s.

The moral of the story? Save and invest as much money as you can in the next five years, and put your money more in growth stocks as opposed to real estate or bonds. Enjoy the grand finale of the greatest boom in history! But as we get closer to the demographic turning point, you need to get conservative. You’ll need to start “acting Japanese.”


More absurdity. First, the Japanese public had a large savings to draw from and we don't. Dent forgot about that. They didn't start to save just as their deflation set in. And Americans are being scolded by the rest of the world as spendthrifts? Then why do all the FCB's keep buying our bonds to encourage more of it? Hmmm? Joe Europack hasn't called me up to say I'm not saving enough. Why would he even care? He's got his own problems.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

wE ARE BEING KEPT ALIVE by the Entropic movement of Dark Matter(Sino-Nippo-dollar purchasing of $UST)---as soon as there is a ringing sound,a sign of an clogged artriosclerotic wormhole on the emergency fiat-meter it will end--dynamic equilibrium,will have been achieved;better known as death

beardrech :ph34r: :ph34r: Where is it all coming from??? Somewhere over the Rainbow far far away

#66

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 03:21 AM

H S Dent has an interesting article on todays Daily Reckoning...he reckons 2010 before the shite hits the fan.

4 more years of this will be enough to send me completely insane... :lol:  :huh:  :o

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Dent makes alot of observations based on an elitist mindset, a very common failing of the Daily Reckoning. The publisher, Bill Bonner, doesn't even live in America but that doesn't stop him from hurling rocks from his european abode.

Here is a quote from the Dent piece:

The single biggest expense to the average family is children, and the older they get the more expensive they become until they finally leave home. The U.S. Government estimates that the cost of raising a child born today from birth through high school to be $211,370. Raising the standard two children would set an American family back nearly half a million dollars, and these figures do not take university education costs into account. It is this highly predictable spending by families that drives our modern, mass-affluent economy. This spending continues even during very difficult times, as the first half of this decade has shown.


He completely fails to explain how this spending continues. It is simple. The housing ATM. I'd also like to examine how the government came to that 211,370 figure, 'cause that smells like BS too.

Since the year 2000, Americans have suffered through one of the worst bear markets in history, a disputed presidential election in 2000, and the worst terrorist attack in American history, two subsequent wars in Afghanistan in Iraq, and a massive oil bubble. Yet despite the chaos, consumer spending has actually risen every quarter though it all. It appears that even calamities of biblical proportions cannot stop the American consumer.


Helloooo... Americans are clearly in more debt than ever before! It's on practically every chart in the freakin' universe! Consumer debt, lack of savings, housing ATM. That is how the spending continues

Are Americans blind to the world around them? Of course not. At worst, they can be accused of being a little stubborn. Americans will do anything in their power to maintain their standard of living, even if it means taking on more debt than they should. The typical American dad doesn’t consider the trade deficit or the price/earnings ratio of the S&P 500 when Junior grows an inch and needs a new pair of jeans. Instead, Dad just buys the jeans and figures out how to pay for it later. As a general rule, people simply do not consider the macro economy when making household decisions. They may fret about it, but at the end of the day they still buy that big, gas-guzzling SUV when Junior and his friends start carpooling to soccer practice.


Please Harry, come out of your elitist house the hamptons. The man on the street does not know what the trade deficit even is, who their representatives in Congress are, how interest rates work, or even what a price/earnings ratio is.

The good news is that the largest section of the Baby Boomer generation is quickly approaching their peak spending years, which will shift our economy into another bubble boom. The bad news is that once this mass of Boomers passes that threshold, consumer spending will slow down progressively for over a decade. When it does, our economy and stock markets will suffer.


And that boom will be in what this time? Stocks? Housing is done, unless the boomers figure out how to trade amongst themselves. Everyone below them is locked out unless exotic loans can be used.

Our policymakers will follow the example of the Japanese, because it is the only model they can reasonably be expected to follow. And as in Japan, the policies used will ease the pain a little but will certainly not cure the disease. Americans, long scolded by the rest of the world as being spendthrifts, will suddenly start to resemble their Asian counterparts in their saving habits. Consumer spending will fall, and the economy will scratch and claw frantically just to avoid falling into the abyss of deflation, the likes of which haven’t been seen on American shores since the 1930s.

The moral of the story? Save and invest as much money as you can in the next five years, and put your money more in growth stocks as opposed to real estate or bonds. Enjoy the grand finale of the greatest boom in history! But as we get closer to the demographic turning point, you need to get conservative. You’ll need to start “acting Japanese.”


More absurdity. First, the Japanese public had a large savings to draw from and we don't. Dent forgot about that. They didn't start to save just as their deflation set in. And Americans are being scolded by the rest of the world as spendthrifts? Then why do all the FCB's keep buying our bonds to encourage more of it? Hmmm? Joe Europack hasn't called me up to say I'm not saving enough. Why would he even care? He's got his own problems.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

wE ARE BEING KEPT ALIVE by the Entropic movement of Dark Matter(Sino-Nippo-dollar purchasing of $UST)---as soon as there is a ringing sound,a sign of an clogged artriosclerotic wormhole on the emergency fiat-meter it will end--dynamic equilibrium,will have been achieved;better known as death

beardrech :ph34r: :ph34r: Where is it all coming from??? Somewhere over the Rainbow far far away

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

hmmm..... :unsure:

looks to me like the FCB's have been checkmated by the Rubinites :lol:

they're stuck holding 50% of all outstanding U.S. debt :P

now they're forced to support both the debt securities and the currency in which those securities are demoninated (sic)

if they keep buying more, they'll become even larger percentage bagholders :ph34r:

or, :)

if they don't, the value of their current holdings will plummet :ph34r:

ergo, checkmate B)

this is the most magnificent swindle of all time :o

#67 cwd

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 03:48 AM

H S Dent has an interesting article on todays Daily Reckoning...he reckons 2010 before the shite hits the fan.

4 more years of this will be enough to send me completely insane... :lol:  :huh:  :o

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Dent makes alot of observations based on an elitist mindset, a very common failing of the Daily Reckoning. The publisher, Bill Bonner, doesn't even live in America but that doesn't stop him from hurling rocks from his european abode.

Here is a quote from the Dent piece:

The single biggest expense to the average family is children, and the older they get the more expensive they become until they finally leave home. The U.S. Government estimates that the cost of raising a child born today from birth through high school to be $211,370. Raising the standard two children would set an American family back nearly half a million dollars, and these figures do not take university education costs into account. It is this highly predictable spending by families that drives our modern, mass-affluent economy. This spending continues even during very difficult times, as the first half of this decade has shown.


He completely fails to explain how this spending continues. It is simple. The housing ATM. I'd also like to examine how the government came to that 211,370 figure, 'cause that smells like BS too.

Since the year 2000, Americans have suffered through one of the worst bear markets in history, a disputed presidential election in 2000, and the worst terrorist attack in American history, two subsequent wars in Afghanistan in Iraq, and a massive oil bubble. Yet despite the chaos, consumer spending has actually risen every quarter though it all. It appears that even calamities of biblical proportions cannot stop the American consumer.


Helloooo... Americans are clearly in more debt than ever before! It's on practically every chart in the freakin' universe! Consumer debt, lack of savings, housing ATM. That is how the spending continues

Are Americans blind to the world around them? Of course not. At worst, they can be accused of being a little stubborn. Americans will do anything in their power to maintain their standard of living, even if it means taking on more debt than they should. The typical American dad doesn’t consider the trade deficit or the price/earnings ratio of the S&P 500 when Junior grows an inch and needs a new pair of jeans. Instead, Dad just buys the jeans and figures out how to pay for it later. As a general rule, people simply do not consider the macro economy when making household decisions. They may fret about it, but at the end of the day they still buy that big, gas-guzzling SUV when Junior and his friends start carpooling to soccer practice.


Please Harry, come out of your elitist house the hamptons. The man on the street does not know what the trade deficit even is, who their representatives in Congress are, how interest rates work, or even what a price/earnings ratio is.

The good news is that the largest section of the Baby Boomer generation is quickly approaching their peak spending years, which will shift our economy into another bubble boom. The bad news is that once this mass of Boomers passes that threshold, consumer spending will slow down progressively for over a decade. When it does, our economy and stock markets will suffer.


And that boom will be in what this time? Stocks? Housing is done, unless the boomers figure out how to trade amongst themselves. Everyone below them is locked out unless exotic loans can be used.

Our policymakers will follow the example of the Japanese, because it is the only model they can reasonably be expected to follow. And as in Japan, the policies used will ease the pain a little but will certainly not cure the disease. Americans, long scolded by the rest of the world as being spendthrifts, will suddenly start to resemble their Asian counterparts in their saving habits. Consumer spending will fall, and the economy will scratch and claw frantically just to avoid falling into the abyss of deflation, the likes of which haven’t been seen on American shores since the 1930s.

The moral of the story? Save and invest as much money as you can in the next five years, and put your money more in growth stocks as opposed to real estate or bonds. Enjoy the grand finale of the greatest boom in history! But as we get closer to the demographic turning point, you need to get conservative. You’ll need to start “acting Japanese.”


More absurdity. First, the Japanese public had a large savings to draw from and we don't. Dent forgot about that. They didn't start to save just as their deflation set in. And Americans are being scolded by the rest of the world as spendthrifts? Then why do all the FCB's keep buying our bonds to encourage more of it? Hmmm? Joe Europack hasn't called me up to say I'm not saving enough. Why would he even care? He's got his own problems.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

wE ARE BEING KEPT ALIVE by the Entropic movement of Dark Matter(Sino-Nippo-dollar purchasing of $UST)---as soon as there is a ringing sound,a sign of an clogged artriosclerotic wormhole on the emergency fiat-meter it will end--dynamic equilibrium,will have been achieved;better known as death

beardrech :ph34r: :ph34r: Where is it all coming from??? Somewhere over the Rainbow far far away

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

hmmm..... :unsure:

looks to me like the FCB's have been checkmated by the Rubinites :lol:

they're stuck holding 50% of all outstanding U.S. debt :P

now they're forced to support both the debt securities and the currency in which those securities are demoninated (sic) :)

if they keep buying more, they'll become even larger percentage bagholders :ph34r:

or,

if they don't, the value of their current holdings will plummet :ph34r:

ergo, checkmate B)

this is the most magnificent swindle of all time :o

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



What do the bagholders do when they figure out that they have been had? <_<

#68

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 03:55 AM

What do the bagholders do when they figure out that they have been had? <_<

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

they're checkmated

they can't do anything

except Ben Dover and smile

#69 Henny Penny

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 04:25 AM

What do the bagholders do when they figure out that they have been had? <_<

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

they're checkmated

they can't do anything

except Ben Dover and smile

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Well - I don't think it will end in such a benign manner. Consider this hypothetical conversation between US and say, China over the past couple decades:

China " we cannot grow, because we dont have enough oil"
US: " Hmm .. lets see now, we have an idea - You make sneakers for us and your problem will be solved"
China: getting really excited " we make sneakers for you - you give us oil? Okaaay"
US: " well - not exactly - You make sneakers for us , we give you some green paper"
China: puzszled " what? you give us green paper?paper? we need OIL"
US: " heres the beauty part - you take our paper over to any country in the middle east etc - and they will give you oil - plenty oil"
China: "seems strange - but we try for 20 years - if no work out we will have to take oil fields over the old fashioned way"
US : " those old days are over, TRUST US - this scheme works great"

#70 Jimbo

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 08:40 AM

EATING THE PIGMAN CRUMBS

Shorty

No shame in eating the pig men crumbs

Only way for the little fish day traders to actually make some money.

Either you eat the pig men crumbs

OR

Your FOOD for the pig men

Only two alternatives

Brisbane

Aussie stocks have been in a nicely trending upwards bull market

US has been in a choppy very frustrating sideways market.

US stock market not trending strongly in either direction.

Only the pigmen black boxes can make money chopping up and chopping down.

Im going to sell my Orica which looks like its topping out and load up on AWB.

Any firm that can give Saddam Hussain $300 million in defiance of the UN sanctions cant be all bad can it!!!!!!!!!
timoleon

#71 Jimbo

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 09:22 AM

TELECOM THE NEXT CHAPTER 11 PARADISE


RAILS.......STEEL.....TEXTILES......AIRLINES.......CAR PARTS......PHOTOS..... MOTORS......

I think the technological change in the Telecoms field eg the entry of the cable companies and mobile has basically turned it into a hyper competitive field with low barriers to entry ......

Making it a chapter 11 paradise... especially for the established players.
timoleon





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