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I have no comment about this.

I needed to read it twice to be sure I understood his question.

 

http://www.latimes.com/classified/realesta...realestate-news

 

Question: After being in my house for a year, the market value is considerably less than the appraised value. I feel I was deceived by the builder and the appraiser. Who do I talk to about this?

 

My mortgage was for the full appraised value. I want to stay in my house, but I don't want to pay for a mortgage with a balance that is more than the house is worth. Is there any way I can get the lender to reduce my note to the real value of the house? I thought about selling, but the new appraisal is for considerably less than the mortgage balance

570656[/snapback]

 

Here's a revised version of the same question:

 

After owning 1,000 shares of a stock for a year, the market value is considerably less than what I paid for it. I feel I was deceived by my broker and by Barron's, where I first learned about this stock. I thought about selling, but I don't want to receive less than I paid for the shares. Who do I talk to about this?

570662[/snapback]

well that one's easy

 

pick an option strike price above the price you paid for the stock

 

continue selling covered calls at that strike price every month until the stock is called away

 

this will give you a profit when you are called, and a positive cash flow in the meantime

 

OH I FORGOT, BEANIE BABIES ARE WORSE SPECULATIONS THAN STOCKS, BECAUSE YOU CAN'T SELL COVERED CALLS TO HEDGE, AND YOU HAVE A NEGATIVE CASSH FLOW EVERY SINGLE MONTH FOR INTEREST, MROTGOUGE PRINCIPAL, TAXES, INSURANCE, HOMOANER ASSOCIATION FEES, MAINTENANCE, LANDSCRAPING, AND KITCHEN UPGRADES TO COMPETE WITH THE NEIGHBORS. HEY MARGE JUST GOT A CUSTOM PAVING STONE DRIVEWAY! HONEY RIP OURS UP WITH A JACKHAMMER....GET BUSY!

 

I suppose you could always rent the basement out to Uncle Perv :lol:

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I have no comment about this.

I needed to read it twice to be sure I understood his question.

 

http://www.latimes.com/classified/realesta...realestate-news

 

Question: After being in my house for a year, the market value is considerably less than the appraised value. I feel I was deceived by the builder and the appraiser. Who do I talk to about this?

 

My mortgage was for the full appraised value. I want to stay in my house, but I don't want to pay for a mortgage with a balance that is more than the house is worth. Is there any way I can get the lender to reduce my note to the real value of the house? I thought about selling, but the new appraisal is for considerably less than the mortgage balance

570656[/snapback]

 

Here's a revised version of the same question:

 

After owning 1,000 shares of a stock for a year, the market value is considerably less than what I paid for it. I feel I was deceived by my broker and by Barron's, where I first learned about this stock. I thought about selling, but I don't want to receive less than I paid for the shares. Who do I talk to about this?

570662[/snapback]

Here's another revised version of the same question:

 

After being in my house for a year, the market value is considerably more than the appraised value. I feel I was unjustly enriched by the builder and the appraiser. Who do I talk to about this? Who should I send a check to for my unearned gain?

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Martin A. Armstrong April 1998 Tokyo Seminar:

 

"There is a significant difference between today and 1929. There are some who claim that we are headed towards a major depression. I do not believe a major depression is possible. The main reason is that the depression of the 1930s was caused by defaults of governments around the world. All of Europe permanently defaulted in its debt with the exception of Switzerland and Britain (which went into a 6-month temporary default). Russia, China, most of Asia, South America all defaulted on their debts. Canada and US did not default, although many at the time expected them to. The reason we had a severe world economic depression was this. If you had issued debt it was payable in gold. If you did not have the gold you could not pay your debts. Today we only need to pay currency. Governments need only print more money. It would take a conscious effort on the part of world governments today to create a major global default. Politicians would have to say that they would no longer be paying social security and that they are going to default on all their obligations and I do not see this as possible. The system is automatically set to inflate out and the politicians will merely change the indices to disguise what they have done."

 

Exposing the FED like that is a big No No! off to jail you go!

570623[/snapback]

Printed money is not the same as "available" credit, especially in today's ultra-leveraged, high money velocity, global digital trading environment. My guess is 99.9 % of all the 0's and 1's, in every bank in the world, reconcile to a credit account instead of an asset account.

 

The system will deflate, not inflate, when the barter value of curency (fiat) is considered non-negotiable payment for scarce resources.

 

I doubt it gets to the point where the price of a barrel of oil floats with the price of a dozen chickens, a month's supply of Prozac, or a limo full or Russian escorts. Practicality dicates a reference of value. Another country or economic union of countries will, for any number if reasons, soon find it's currency has become the world's premier accepted medium of trade.

 

My vote is da Yen.

 

The transition period is biphasic -> inflationary up to a point, and then deflationary. Many share this view that, at some nebulous point in the distant future - usually after one's perceived year of death - there will be plague of global deflaltion that wipes the slate clean.

 

I think were are at that point now (ie, we have had all the inflation we are going to have). More credit expansion, not more money supply, is needed to keep inlfation alive.

 

Peak Paper is here.

 

The subprimes were just a glimpse ...

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Martin A. Armstrong April 1998 Tokyo Seminar:

 

"There is a significant difference between today and 1929. There are some who claim that we are headed towards a major depression. I do not believe a major depression is possible. The main reason is that the depression of the 1930s was caused by defaults of governments around the world. All of Europe permanently defaulted in its debt with the exception of Switzerland and Britain (which went into a 6-month temporary default). Russia, China, most of Asia, South America all defaulted on their debts. Canada and US did not default, although many at the time expected them to. The reason we had a severe world economic depression was this. If you had issued debt it was payable in gold. If you did not have the gold you could not pay your debts. Today we only need to pay currency. Governments need only print more money. It would take a conscious effort on the part of world governments today to create a major global default. Politicians would have to say that they would no longer be paying social security and that they are going to default on all their obligations and I do not see this as possible. The system is automatically set to inflate out and the politicians will merely change the indices to disguise what they have done."

 

Exposing the FED like that is a big No No! off to jail you go!

570623[/snapback]

Printed money is not the same as "available" credit, especially in today's ultra-leveraged, high money velocity, global digital trading environment. My guess is 99.9 % of all the 0's and 1's, in every bank in the world, reconcile to a credit account instead of an asset account.

 

The system will deflate, not inflate, when the barter value of curency (fiat) is considered non-negotiable payment for scarce resources.

 

I doubt it gets to the point where the price of a barrel of oil floats with the price of a dozen chickens, a month's supply of Prozac, or a limo full or Russian escorts. Practicality dicates a reference of value. Another country or economic union of countries will, for any number if reasons, soon find it's currency has become the world's premier accepted medium of trade.

 

My vote is da Yen.

 

The transition period is biphasic -> inflationary up to a point, and then deflationary. Many share this view that, at some nebulous point in the distant future - usually after one's perceived year of death - there will be plague of global deflaltion that wipes the slate clean.

 

I think were are at that point now (ie, we have had all the inflation we are going to have). More credit expansion, not more money supply, is needed to keep inlfation alive.

 

Peak Paper is here.

 

The subprimes were just a glimpse ...

570665[/snapback]

 

The lack of trust in fiat is a common problem in ragtag countries like Argentina and Venezuela just to cite recent examples (Chavez, Kirchner Mask Surge in Living Costs by Controlling Data )

but when you talk about the world's reserve currency you can bet every economy in the world has the interest to keep the fiat trust.

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is this us???

 

 

:lol: :lol: :lol:

 

Michael Nystrom is somebody who I consider a friend out there in cyberspace, who whether or not I agree with his conclusions I feel always brings his 'A' game with sincerity and thoughtfulness. Here, Michael discusses The New Golden Age - The Coming Revolution Against Political Corruption and Economic Chaos.

 

It is easy to go on autopilot and predict a coming economic and social Armageddon (there are 'Acquisitors' who make money keeping people gridlocked in fear just as there are those that perpetually serve up easy and ongoing bullish optimism) but it not so easy to envision the positive change that can eventually result from the painful process of social 'progress'. There is little doubt that as the "rich get richer" (inflation) and - speaking for we here in the US - the country becomes more angst ridden and divided both socio-economically and politically, we are in some sort of high energy transition. But the degree to which the general public is not yet fully aware or engaged implies that a soft revolution I would hope for is still out there on the horizon.

 

http://www.safehaven.com/article-7216.htm

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Martin A. Armstrong April 1998 Tokyo Seminar:

 

"There is a significant difference between today and 1929. There are some who claim that we are headed towards a major depression. I do not believe a major depression is possible. The main reason is that the depression of the 1930s was caused by defaults of governments around the world. All of Europe permanently defaulted in its debt with the exception of Switzerland and Britain (which went into a 6-month temporary default). Russia, China, most of Asia, South America all defaulted on their debts. Canada and US did not default, although many at the time expected them to. The reason we had a severe world economic depression was this. If you had issued debt it was payable in gold. If you did not have the gold you could not pay your debts. Today we only need to pay currency. Governments need only print more money. It would take a conscious effort on the part of world governments today to create a major global default. Politicians would have to say that they would no longer be paying social security and that they are going to default on all their obligations and I do not see this as possible. The system is automatically set to inflate out and the politicians will merely change the indices to disguise what they have done."

 

Exposing the FED like that is a big No No! off to jail you go!

570623[/snapback]

Printed money is not the same as "available" credit, especially in today's ultra-leveraged, high money velocity, global digital trading environment. My guess is 99.9 % of all the 0's and 1's, in every bank in the world, reconcile to a credit account instead of an asset account.

 

The system will deflate, not inflate, when the barter value of curency (fiat) is considered non-negotiable payment for scarce resources.

 

I doubt it gets to the point where the price of a barrel of oil floats with the price of a dozen chickens, a month's supply of Prozac, or a limo full or Russian escorts. Practicality dicates a reference of value. Another country or economic union of countries will, for any number if reasons, soon find it's currency has become the world's premier accepted medium of trade.

 

My vote is da Yen.

 

The transition period is biphasic -> inflationary up to a point, and then deflationary. Many share this view that, at some nebulous point in the distant future - usually after one's perceived year of death - there will be plague of global deflaltion that wipes the slate clean.

 

I think were are at that point now (ie, we have had all the inflation we are going to have). More credit expansion, not more money supply, is needed to keep inlfation alive.

 

Peak Paper is here.

 

The subprimes were just a glimpse ...

570665[/snapback]

 

The lack of trust in fiat is a common problem in ragtag countries like Argentina and Venezuela just to cite recent examples (Chavez, Kirchner Mask Surge in Living Costs by Controlling Data )

but when you talk about the world's reserve currency you can bet every economy in the world has the interest to keep the fiat trust.

570666[/snapback]

 

Just heard on Financial Sense that non-government ownership of gold exceeds government ownership for the the first time?

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"Real estate has been New York-based Blackstone's best- performing investment since the company started buying property 16 years ago, with net returns averaging 29 percent a year, according to documents for its initial public offering."

 

hmm, I wonder why they're going public with such excellent prospects for RE.

 

``Blackstone is phenomenal at being able to read the market and seizing the opportunity,'' said Stuart Shiff, founder of Divco West, a San Francisco-based real estate firm. ``There is no sign of an end of capital flows into real estate, and they know how to use financial tools to squeeze the margin out of deals.''

 

I can't agree more with the outlined quote, but not in the sense of the 2nd quote.

 

link

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"Real estate has been New York-based Blackstone's best- performing investment since the company started buying property 16 years ago, with net returns averaging 29 percent a year, according to documents for its initial public offering."

 

hmm, I wonder why they're going public with such excellent prospects for RE.

 

``Blackstone is phenomenal at being able to read the market and seizing the opportunity,'' said Stuart Shiff, founder of Divco West, a San Francisco-based real estate firm. ``There is no sign of an end of capital flows into real estate, and they know how to use financial tools to squeeze the margin out of deals.''

 

I can't agree more with the outlined quote, but not in the sense of the 2nd quote.

 

link

570673[/snapback]

 

One of the signs of a coming "end" is when folks like Shiff say things like "there is no sign of an end of capital flows into real estate."

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"Real estate has been New York-based Blackstone's best- performing investment since the company started buying property 16 years ago, with net returns averaging 29 percent a year, according to documents for its initial public offering."

 

hmm, I wonder why they're going public with such excellent prospects for RE.

 

``Blackstone is phenomenal at being able to read the market and seizing the opportunity,'' said Stuart Shiff, founder of Divco West, a San Francisco-based real estate firm. ``There is no sign of an end of capital flows into real estate, and they know how to use financial tools to squeeze the margin out of deals.''

 

I can't agree more with the outlined quote, but not in the sense of the 2nd quote.

 

link

570673[/snapback]

 

One of the signs of a coming "end" is when folks like Shiff say things like "there is no sign of an end of capital flows into real estate."

570674[/snapback]

 

 

As I understand the IPO deal, the partners are selling only a non voting share in the management company, not an interest in any of the deals. :lol: :lol:

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I have no comment about this.

I needed to read it twice to be sure I understood his question.

 

http://www.latimes.com/classified/realesta...realestate-news

 

Question: After being in my house for a year, the market value is considerably less than the appraised value. I feel I was deceived by the builder and the appraiser. Who do I talk to about this?

 

My mortgage was for the full appraised value. I want to stay in my house, but I don't want to pay for a mortgage with a balance that is more than the house is worth. Is there any way I can get the lender to reduce my note to the real value of the house? I thought about selling, but the new appraisal is for considerably less than the mortgage balance

570656[/snapback]

 

I like the second question even more.

 

  My wife and I own a home that we bought years ago for $200,000. It is now worth about $700,000.

 

If we stay in the house another 10 years and then sell, and the value then is $1.2 million, we will be liable for a capital gains tax on $500,000. This is the total capital gain of $1 million less the $500,000 capital gain exclusion for a couple.

 

They've already extrapolated another $500,000. Like it's automatic. In 10 years the house will be worth $1.2 million. It's a given.

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I have no comment about this.

I needed to read it twice to be sure I understood his question.

 

http://www.latimes.com/classified/realesta...realestate-news

 

Question: After being in my house for a year, the market value is considerably less than the appraised value. I feel I was deceived by the builder and the appraiser. Who do I talk to about this?

 

My mortgage was for the full appraised value. I want to stay in my house, but I don't want to pay for a mortgage with a balance that is more than the house is worth. Is there any way I can get the lender to reduce my note to the real value of the house? I thought about selling, but the new appraisal is for considerably less than the mortgage balance

570656[/snapback]

 

I like the second question even more.

 

 

? My wife and I own a home that we bought years ago for $200,000. It is now worth about $700,000.

 

If we stay in the house another 10 years and then sell, and the value then is $1.2 million, we will be liable for a capital gains tax on $500,000. This is the total capital gain of $1 million less the $500,000 capital gain exclusion for a couple.

 

They've already extrapolated another $500,000. Like it's automatic. In 10 years the house will be worth $1.2 million. It's a given.

570676[/snapback]

 

 

I just aughed at that one.

Perhaps they can tell us what DOW will print in 10 years.

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Someone at Investors Hub did an analysis of profits and losses at AMD over the 36 years of its existance and they've made a grand total of $2.6 million over the course of their company's existance. I'm expecting a whopper of a loss for Q1 so that should be wiped out pretty soon.

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Keep an eye on the GOOG....

Moritz's Real Google Conflict

The internets are all in a kerfluffle over why Michael Moritz, uberpartner at Sequoia Capital, has decided to step down from Google's (GOOG) board. Some have even speculated that Sequoia has some secret little Google-slaying search-engine startup in the works, and that's why Moritz is stepping down.

 

http://blogs.business2.com/beta/2007/03/moritzs_real_go.html

570640[/snapback]

 

WIKI?

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what is up with silver and more specific SLW ! thats been a dog for me.

570682[/snapback]

 

If one was going to place their bet on SLW for the next quarter would you rather take it near here at recent quarterly lows down to the 9 area?

 

I would rather buy a retest of a quarterly low. I would also have to assume the pigmen are quietly accumulating the gold sector and in anticipation of price rising up to the 10.50 for the first bit of supply area. If your wrong then maybe it needs to find demand a tad lower below 9.

 

I can't direct you into any other direction than subscribing to Doc's precious metals newsletter.

 

SLW with quarterly closes drawn to show performance.

http://www.StockSharePublishing.com/ChartL..._1174877083.png

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